How to spend a Tuesday in January, with Alexander Hutchison

Excuse me for saying so

But you look like Tuesday

was payday, and Monday had never

come.

-Alexander Hutchison

This morning, needing something to cheer me up after the day after the most depressing day of the year, I turned once again to the work of Alexander Hutchison, especially his most humorous poems, and I felt once again refreshed. Translating these poems into Spanish was a tremendous adventure which I will carry with me always.

Gavia Stellata, a selection of his work, is published in a bilingual edition in Mexico by Mantis Editores. The book launch took place at the Guadalajara Book Fair in 2015. We received our copies in November, only a few days prior to the author’s death. I will always treasure the lively debates I had with Alexander (“Sandy,” as his friends called him) on the meanings of various words and phrases – in English, Doric, and Spanish!

This was made possible thanks to an award by Creative Scotland. If you would like a copy, please let me know. I’m at juana.girasola@gmail.com.

gavia stellata.jpg

One-Handed 2: Afternoon Light /// A House Within A House

This is the second in a series of exclusive publications out of the One-Handed project, curated by Juana Adcock and Rahul Berry, featuring Omar Pimienta, Rosalind Harvey, and Rachel McCrum http://mexicocitylit.com/one-handed-2-afternoon-light-a-house-within-a-house/#more-806

‘One-Handed is an experimental translation project. We worked by pairing Mexican and Scottish poets together. The Mexican poet translated a source text taken from the poetry collection Manca by Juana Adcock (Fondo Editorial Tierra Adentro, 2014). The resulting text was then both translated into English by a literary translator, and fed through Google Translate and sent to a Scottish poet, who used this “literal version” to produce their own translation of the poem. The source texts by Juana Adcock have been lost, decaying and falling away like a perishable item cast in plaster. Or alternatively, they can be found in the pages of the above-cited book. The focus of the One-Handed project is on the process of writing as translation and viceversa.’

Guido Floyd’s collage series Metamorphosis will be included in Collage Mexico, a forthcoming book from Mexico City Lit.

One-Handed 1: Survival /// Journey Into Exile

One-Handed: poetry by Mexicans, translators, Scots and Google

This is the first of three exclusive publications from the One-Handed project in Mexico City Lit. Poems by Amaranta Caballero and Lorna Callery, with Guido Floyd’s collage series MetamorphosisRead the poems here: http://mexicocitylit.com/one-handed-1-survival-journey-into-exile/

One-Handed is an experimental translation project, curated by Juana Adcock and Rahul Bery: ‘We worked by pairing Mexican and Scottish poets together. The Mexican poet translated a source text taken from the poetry collection Manca by Juana Adcock (Fondo Editorial Tierra Adentro, 2014). The resulting text was then both translated into English by a literary translator, and fed through Google Translate and sent to a Scottish poet, who used this “literal version” to produce their own translation of the poem. The source texts by Juana Adcock have been lost, decaying and falling away like a perishable item cast in plaster. Or alternatively, they can be found in the pages of the above-cited book. The focus of the One-Handed project is on the process of writing as translation and viceversa.

50 Reasons Not To Befriend A Poet

Betty Generic

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It may sound romantic, but in search of that elusive metaphor, poets can be somewhat  “eccentric.”

  1. If you date a poet everyone will think you are the jerk they are writing about.
  2. You will be the jerk they are writing about.
  3. They have an unnatural affection for book stores and office supply stores.
  4. They have deep conversations with Animals, Clouds, and Grecian Urns.
  5. Excessive use of  “poetry hands.”
  6. Excessive abuse of  “poetic licence.”
  7. Excessive use of  “melancholy.”
  8. Excessive use of  “dramatic emphasis.”
  9. They collect obscure words that have not been in circulation for at least 100 years or more.
  10. They insert these antediluvian words into conversations just to rebel.
  11. They think children’s books are sublime.
  12. They refuse to care where the remote is.
  13. All of their furniture are positioned around windows, for them to stare out for hours at a time.
  14. Your parents will think they are possessed.
  15. They are possessed.
  16. You…

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NEW POETRY BY JUANA ADCOCK

Glasgow Review of Books

Juana Adcock is a writer and translator working in English and Spanish. She was born in Mexico and has been living in Glasgow for seven years. She completed a masters in Creative Writing in 2009 at the University of Glasgow. Her work has been included in anthologies and literary magazines in Mexico, the UK, the USA, Germany and Sweden. Her first poetry collection, Manca, was published early 2014 in Mexico. Her website can be found at jennivora.com and her Twitter handle is @jennivora.

Click on the arrow to view the poems full-screen.

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THIS IS ALT LIT: ANOMIE IN THE AGE OF SOCIAL NETWORKS

Glasgow Review of Books

Mira Gonzalez i will never be beautiful enough to make us beautiful together (Sorry House, 2013)

Steve Roggenbuck IF YOU DONT LOVE THE MOON YOUR AN ASSHOLE (free .pdf, 2013)

Internet Poetry, Tumblr blog, internetpoetry.tumblr.com, 2011-present

by Calum Rodger

Since a body of rules is the specific form which is assumed by spontaneously established relations between social functions in the course of time, we can say, a priori, that the state of anomie is impossible wherever interdependent organs are sufficiently in contact and sufficiently extensive. If they are close to each other, they are readily aware, in every situation, of the need which they have of one-another, and consequently they have an active and permanent feeling of mutual dependence. […] But if, on the other hand, they are not clearly visible to each other, then only stimuli of a certain intensity can be communicated from one…

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Juana Adcock on ‘A Bird is not a Stone’

A Bird Is Not A Stone

Our second poet’s blog post, by Juana Adcock, reflects on what can and can’t be translated. The original can be read on Juana’s blog:

I am really excited about the forthcoming publication A Bird Is Not A Stone, an anthology of contemporary Palestinian poetry translated into English, Scots, Gaelic and Shetlandic. The book will be published in summer 2014 by Freight Press.
The poems, by 25 different artists, were translated using the ‘bridge’ method, in which Scottish poets worked from literal translations to create new ‘versions’ of the works. The poems were selected by the House of Poetry in al-Bireh, Palestine, and translated in Scotland. The idea for the project was born at a meeting between Murad al-Sudani and Rana Barakat of the House of Poetry and Scottish poets Liz Lochhead, Billy Letford, Henry King, Henry Bell and Lorna MacBean in summer 2012.
I worked very hard at my…

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